Saltwaterfish.com
Call Us 772-462-0203
Home| My Tank| Contact Us| My Cart|
15 Day Live Guarantee Lowest Shipping Rates

FREE Shipping w/ $99 or more Marine Life purchase! Use coupon code: freefedex

FREE SHIPPING

Best deal!

Purchase $99 or more in Marine Life and shipping is FREE!

Use coupon code:

freefedex

Hurry, ends in...

Only one coupon code per order. May not be combined with other coupon codes like new customer discount, store credits & others. New order only.

...enter keyword
My Account
Forgot your password?
Are you a new user?
Resources
Deep Blue Seas Foundation
Returns & Guarantee
Gift Certificates
Sustainability Mandate
Shipping
Free Shipping in FLORIDA
Reef Rewards
Acclimation
Message Board
Follow Us
Twitter Facebook YouTube



See Saltwaterfish.com Reviews at Bizrate.com

SaltWaterFish.com is an Upfront Merchant on TheFind. Click for info.
Home > Sale Items > Invertebrates
Fighting Conch - Wild
Strombus alatus
Fighting Conch - Wild
  Care Level
Reef Rewards:
17
Reef Rewards Points
will be rewarded to you when you buy this item.
Learn about our Reef Rewards
Price Elsewhere: $19.99
Saltwaterfish Price: $16.99
Savings: $3.00
Free Shipping
FREE SHIPPING
On All Marine Life
Orders Over $149
More Details
Tank Stats
Size: 1-3 inches
Care Level: Easy
Temperament: Peaceful
Reef Safe: Yes
Diet: Algae
Origin: Western Atlantic
Acclimation Time: 1+ Hours
Coral Safe:
Invertebrate Safe:
Minimum Tank Size:
Review this item
Share |
Email a friend
 Add to Wish List
The Fighting Conch makes a great addition to an aquarium set up. It eats up brown diatoms that grow on live sand beds, and rocks. Therefore, we recommend you to keep some live rocks in the tank that can encourage the growth of algae. The Fighting Conch should not be kept in a tank less than 30 gallon. The conch grows by increasing its swirling body while producing a protective shell, which protects its soft body from predators. The Fighting Conch exhibits a foot pad which it extends from its shell and allows it to drag its shell along. At the time of dragging itself, its mouth and eyes comes out of the shell. Though the Fighting Conch is a hardy species, it is also considered a very good sand sifter that helps in aerating the tank. As it burrows through the sand, it cleans the bottom and aerates too. The Fighting Conch grows up to 3 inches and therefore should be kept in a larger tank. It makes a great and valuable addition in to your reef tank. The Fighting Conch is mainly omnivores and consumes detritus, and can be supplied with the pieces of fresh fish, and dried seaweed, as well as high quality frozen foods, to supplement what it will feed on from the bottom of the tank. The Fighting Conch thrives well in a temperature range of 72-78 degrees Fahrenheit, and pH of 8.10-8.40. It is sensitive to nitrite and copper and may prove lethal for this species. The Fighting Conch is considered reef safe and doesn?t bother any kind of coral present in the tank.
[short_review]
[long_review]
Reviewed by:  [user_name] from [user_city]. [user_email] on [review_date]
The Florida Fighting Conch makes a great addition to larger tanks. They eat brown diatoms (algae) that grow on live sand beds. Fighting Conchs will bury themselves in the sand bed and clean the upper layers. These Jumbo Conchs should not be placed in an aquarium less than 100 gallons.Conchs belong to a Class known as Gastropods, which make up the largest class of Mollusks. Conchs grow by increasing their swirling body while producing a protective shell. This shell protects their soft body from predators. They use a pad, or foot, that extends from their shell which allows them to drag their shell along. As they drag their shell often times their mouth and eyes can be seen coming out from the opening of the shell.
care-level-1.gif
Related Items
Peppermint Shrimp - Group of 10 - Limit 1
Peppermint Shrimp - Group of 10 - Limit 1
Pencil Urchin - Group of 2
Pencil Urchin - Group of 2
Hard Tube Coco Worm
Hard Tube Coco Worm
Adopted Sally Lightfoot
Adopted Sally Lightfoot
 
All sizes listed are only approximate representations. All pictures and descriptions are generalizations and cannot be exact representations.